A Cornell honey bee collects nectar from a purple loosestrife flower

Research @ Cornell: sampling honey bee pollen for pesticide analysis

Bumble bees pollinating a sunflower

Bees on Sunflower

Welcome to the Pollinator Network @ Cornell

Pollinators are essential for maintaining floral diversity and for producing many important agricultural crops that feed residents of New York and other areas of the world. 

Pollinators in the News

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Upcoming Honey Bee Workshop in Jefferson County

Published: 
Nov 3, 2016
The Dyce Laboratory of Honey Bee Studies and Cornell Cooperative Extension Jefferson County are hosting the workshop: 
Parasites and pathogens of honey bees: the biology and management of Varroa mites and American foulbrood.
This workshop is targeted toward beekeepers with 0-3 years of experience, or for anyone who wants some refresher training. Topics will include Varroa mite biology and management, as well as American foulbrood identification, control, and new FDA regulations for antibiotics in the US.

Date: Monday, November 21, 2016
Time: 5:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Location: Cornell Cooperative Extension of Jefferson County Office, 203 North Hamilton Street, Watertown NY 13601 
Registration Cost: $30 pre-registration, $35 at the door, and free to veterans and active duty military

Click here to register, or email Emma Mullen (ekm75@cornell.edu) for more information.

Following the Wild Bees: The Craft and Science of Bee Hunting

Published: 
Aug 22, 2016
Join Thomas D. Seeley, the Horace White Professor in Biology in the Department of Neurobiology and Behavior at Cornell, for a Chats in the Stacks book talk about Following the Wild Bees (Princeton University Press; May 3, 2016). This event is open to the public and will take place in Cornell University Mann Library, Room 160 at 4:00 pm.

European foulbrood resembling American foulbrood in New York State

Published: 
Jul 15, 2016
State inspectors have been finding cases of European foulbrood in New York State this year that bear an uncanny resemblance to American foulbrood. Beekeepers are urged to submit samples of suspicious brood to the Beltsville Bee Lab in Maryland for a free analysis to determine i) if the brood is indeed infected with AFB, and if so, ii) whether or not the bacteria show resistance to antibiotics. If the results come back positive for AFB, beekeepers must report this by law to the state apiculturist Paul Cappy. An inspector will come to your operation and supervise the destruction of infected colonies. Please do not burn colonies without lab confirmation of American foulbrood or without an inspector present.
 
Click here to learn how to submit samples to the Beltsville Bee Lab

New state pollinator protection plan announced at Cornell

Published: 
Jun 27, 2016
State officials and Kathryn Boor, the Ronald P. Lynch Dean of Cornell’s College of the Agriculture and Life Sciences, announced recommendations of the New York State Pollinator Task Force at Cornell’s Dyce Lab for Honey Bee Studies in Varna, New York, June 24.
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